Why we celebrate Valentine’s Day?

So many times I have asked my young fellows that why do they celebrate Valentine’s Day but they could not satisfy me with their answer. All of them are interested in throwing flowers and in making new relations(fake). But is it according to our social set-up? Is it justified according to our religion? Why do we not consider that we are living in a Muslim society? And if we are not able to resist it or we want to celebrate it as all other world do than why we do we not take it as a positive way to build our society? We can distribute and spread love to those who deserve it rather than those who do not.

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3 Replies to “Why we celebrate Valentine’s Day?”

  1. i can say there are many other ways to express love that are religiously acceptable.islam does recognise happy occasions that bring people closer to one another and spice to their lives.however,islam goes blindly special occasions such Valentine’s Day.
    Valentine’s day has no religious backing.ISLAM REQUIRES ALL MUSLIMS TO LOVE ONE ANOTHER ALL OVER THE WHOLE YEAR,AND REDUCING THE WHOLE YEAR TO A SINGLE DAY IS TOTALLY REJECTED.
    Hence,we muslim ought not to follow such footsteps which are known as Valentine’s Day.

  2. We celebrate Valentine’s Day, because until 1969, it was one of the many Saint’s Days observed by the Catholic Church. It was dedicated to the patron saint of romantic causes, St. Valentine.

    Although it was removed from the Church’s calendar in 1969, the religious meaning coupled with Valentine’s Day’s roots in Roman paganism have allowed it to continue as a holiday for everyone.

    Early Christians saw Valentine’s Day as a way to honor St. Valentine, of whom there were actually three. The Catholic Church recognizes three saints by that name, all who were martyred on February 14.

    The St. Valentine the day is named for was, most likely, a priest in the 3rd century who performed secret marriages when the Roman Emperor Claudius II thought single soldiers were more likely to enlist in the army. That St. Valentine was imprisoned and executed on February 4, 270. It is believed he was responsible for giving the jailer’s blind daughter back her eyesight, and before his execution, he sent herss a note saying, “From your Valentine.” The phrase is still widely used on valentines today.

    It wasn’t until 1537 that St. Valentine’s day was declared an official holiday. England’s King Henry VIII, known for his ways of disposing of wives, declared February 14th a holiday. It was another century and a half before religious devotional cards became non-religious cards to reflect the change in the holiday.

    In 496 A.D., February 14, was declared in the name of St. Valentine by Pope Gelasius. It remained a Church holiday until 1969, when Pope Paul VI took it from the calender.

    On February 14, the ancient Romans celebrated the Feast of Lupercalia in honor of Juno, the queen of the Roman gods and goddesses. Juno was also the goddess of womesn and marriage so honoring her was thought to be a fertility rite.

    At the feast held the next day, the women would write love letters and stick them in a large urn. The men would pick a letter from the urn and for the next year, pursue the woman who wrote the chosen letter. This custom lasted until the 1700s when people decided their beloveds should be chosen by sight, not luck.

  3. Praise be to Allah, the Lord of the Worlds, and blessings and peace be upon our Prophet Muhammad and upon all his family and companions. Allah has chosen for us Islam as our religion and He will not accept any other religion from anyone, as He says (interpretation of the meaning):

    “And whoever seeks a religion other than Islam, it will never be accepted of him, and in the Hereafter he will be one of the losers” [Aal ‘Imraan 3:85]

    And the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allah be upon him) told us that groups of his ummah would follow the enemies of Allah in some of their rituals and customs, as it says in the hadeeth of Abu Sa’eed al-Khudri (may Allah be pleased with him), who narrated that the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allah be upon him) said: “You will certainly follow the ways of those who came before you, span by span, cubit by cubit, until even if they were to enter a lizard’s hole, you would follow them.” We said, “O Messenger of Allah, (do you mean) the Jews and Christians?” He said, “Who else? !” (Narrated by al-Bukhaari in al-I’tisaam bi’l-Kitaab wa’l-Sunnah, Baab Qawl al-Nabi (peace and blessings of Allah be upon him) La tattabi’unna Sanan man kaana qablakum, 8/151; and by Muslim in Kitaab al-‘Ilm, Baab Ittibaa’ Sanan al-Yahood wa’l-Nasaara, 4/ 2054)

    What the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allah be upon him) spoke of has indeed come to pass and has become widespread in recent times, in many of the Muslim countries. Many of the Muslims follow the enemies of Allah in many of their customs and ways of behaving, and imitate them in some of their rituals and in celebrating their holidays. The matter has been made even worse by the opening up of mass communications between peoples, whereby the rituals and customs of the kuffaar are now transmitted with the glamorous adornment of sound and image from their countries into the Muslim countries, via satellite TV and the World Wide Web (Internet). Many Muslims have been deceived by their glamour.

    In recent years, a new phenomenon has spread among the Muslim youth – males and females alike – which does not bode well. This is manifested in their imitation of the Christians in their celebration of the Valentine’s Day, which has led the scholars and daa’iyahs to explain the rulings of sharee’ah concerning that, out of sincerity towards Allah, His Messenger, the leaders of the Muslims and their common folk, so that Muslims may have a clear understanding of this issue and so that they will not fall into that which will undermine the belief (‘aqeedah) with which Allah has blessed them. This is a brief discussion of the origins, development and purpose of this holiday, and what the Muslim should do with regard to it.

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